Jeffrey Frankel

 

China’s slowdown and the Chinese stock market

Economics and Finance

Jeffrey Frankel, Harpel Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government on the drop in the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index and in China’s growth rate.

Tackling Food and Fuel Subsidies

Economics and Finance

Subsidies for food and energy are economically inefficient, but can often be politically popular. Jeffrey Frankel, Harpel Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government discusses the efforts by new leaders in Egypt, Indonesia, and India to cut unaffordable subsidies.

Long-term damage of the Argentinian debt ruling

Economics and Finance

Jeffrey Frankel, the Harpel Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government explains that the US court ruling forcing Argentina to pay its hold-out creditors has big implications.

China is not yet Number One

Economics and Finance

Harpel Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government on the widespread recent reports that have trumpeted: “China to overtake US as top economic power this year.” The claim is basically wrong. The US remains the world’s largest economic power by a substantial margin.

How to Address Inequality

Economics and Finance

Professor of Economics at Harvard, Kennedy School, Jeffrey Frankel, argues that commentators should focus on identifying the policies that are best suited to improving income distributions efficiently, and the politicians that support them.

The dollar’s international status

Economics and Finance

Except for the period 1992-2000, the dollar’s role as an international currency has been slowly declining since 1976. Since 2010, there has been another pause in this decline – somewhat surprising, given that the financial crisis began in the US, and given Congress’ recent flirtations with default.

Procyclicalists: Fiscal austerity vs. stimulus

Economics and Finance

Is austerity good or bad? J. Frankel, Professor of Economics at the Harvard Kennedy School argues that it is as foolish to argue this question as it would be to debate whether it is better to drive on the left or right. Procyclical fiscal policy, on the other hand, is another question.