“Frankenstein in Baghdad” Review

By Lev Myshkin

The prize-winning novel “Frankenstein in Baghdad” by Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi has finally been translated into English. His reworking of Mary Shelley’s iconic horror story is set in the Iraqi capital torn apart by sectarian violence.

 

About Shakespeare

By Geoffrey Heptonstall

Shakespeare discovered the secret of language. He had the advantage of living at a moment in history when a new language was coming into being. Modern English was emerging in common speech as a language of exceptional flexibility.

Tree of the Wooden Clogs

By Robert Arnold

Robert Arnold looks back at Italian director Ermanno Olmi’s masterpiece “The Tree of Wooden Clogs” (L’Albero degli Zoccoli), winner of 14 awards including the Palme d’Or for Best film at Cannes in 1978 and the César Award in the same year for Best Foreign Film.

A 17th Century battle of wits. Libertines v Jesuits

By Edward Muir

Gabriel Naudé, the French free-thinker and Cardinal Mazarin’s librarian, famously claimed that seventeenth-century Italy was “full of libertines, atheists, and people who believe in nothing.

“The Constitution” by Rajko Grlić

By Lev Myshkin

Rajko Grlić’s latest film “The Constitution” is excellent, profound and moving. Set in a building where the political tensions of former Yugoslavia are played out with a mixture of hatred, good grace, solidarity and bigotry. An intelligent movie that must be seen.

Political Tours

Political Tours