Newsletter – December 2014

Welcome to The Global Dispatches,

This month we review Philip Marsden's new book Rising Ground, a search for the spirit of place in Cornwall; Ed Vulliamy and Helena Smith on British Perfidy in Greece recounting when the British Army, at war with Germany switched its allegiance, opening fire on a civilian crowd in Syntagma Square, and arming Greeks who had collaborated with the Nazis, to do the same; eminent Sociologist Zygmunt Bauman explains the consequences of the steady dismantling of the institutions intended to defend the victims of an increasingly deregulated greed-driven economy; Edward Chisholm on the meaning of the Battle of Verdun for the French - in the French imagination, Verdun is remembered much like the Somme is by the British. Except here the imagery is perhaps more potent; Frenchmen fought on French soil; Frenchmen with their backs to Paris; Frenchmen against the old German enemy and Rudolf Ungváry, explains that the present Hungarian system is the product of an extreme-right revolt against democracy but instead of playing itself out in the customary "revolutionary uprising" mode, it blends into the political background of the European Union, while quietly ticking away like a time bomb.

And much more..... happy reading and enjoy the festive season.

Review: “Rising Ground” by Philip Marsden
By Lev Myshkin

Another excellent book by Philip Marsden. He takes us on a personal tour of Cornwall to discover how its "ritual landscapes" have the power to move us with their magnetism.

What “Free Trade” Has Done to Central America
By Manuel Perez-Rocha - Julia Paley

Warnings about the human and environmental costs of “free trade” went unheeded. Now the most vulnerable Central Americans are paying the price.

British Perfidy in Greece
By Ed Vulliamy - Helena Smith

It was seventy years ago almost to the day, when the British Army at war with Germany switched their allegiance, opening fire upon a civilian crowd in Syntagma Square, and arming Greeks who had collaborated with the Nazis, to do the same.

The Big Chill: Tensions in the Arctic
By Conn Hallinan

As the climate warms and the ice melts, the Arctic could become the next great theater of global cooperation—or a battlefield that holds 13% of the world’s oil reserves and 30% of its natural gas.

A world without alternatives
By Zygmunt Bauman

Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the Universities of Leeds and Warsaw explains the consequences of the steady dismantling of the institutions intended to defend the victims of an increasingly deregulated greed-driven economy.

Palestinian options at the UN and the ICC
By Victor Kattan

At last, it appears that the United Nations General Assembly’s (UNGA) 138-9 majority vote in November 2012 to accord Palestine observer state status might finally be bearing fruit.

​Verdun, France and Europe
By Edward Chisholm

'During the time that the battle of Verdun raged, the dead from both sides equalled almost the entire losses suffered by the British Empire during the Second World War. Roughly one death every two minutes – night and day – for ten months.'

A rule in the guise of democracy
By Rudolf Ungváry

The present Hungarian system is the product of an extreme-right revolt against democracy but instead of playing itself out in the customary "revolutionary uprising" mode, it blends into the political background of the European Union, while quietly ticking away like a time bomb.

Review: Serhii Plokhy, ‘The Last Empire’
By Rodric Braithwaite

Rodric Braithwaite, British ambassador in Moscow from 1988 to 1992 and author of "Afgantsy" reviews Serhii Plokhy's "The Last Empire", recounting the final days of the Soviet Union.

 
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