Newsletter – January 2015


Welcome to The Global Dispatches and Happy New Year from us,

This month a heavy dose of politics to kick off the year: Eva Nanopoulos, College Lecturer in Law at King’s College, University of Cambridge explains that a defeat of the radical left party Syriza in the upcoming Greek elections would not only mean a win for the conservative ‘New Democracy’ party. It would also testify to the growing prevalence of a ‘neo’ – and largely distorted – version of democracy; Joydeep Gupta and Liu Hongqiao on how the deep differences between developed and developing countries on how to divide the cost of tackling climate change blocked agreement at the Lima Climate Summit; Edward Muir, the Clarence L. Ver Steeg Professor in the Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University with an entertaining article on the battle of wits between Jesuits and Libertines in 17th Century Italy; Kerry Brown, professor of Chinese politics and director of the China Studies Centre at the University of Sydney and associate fellow of Chatham House examines the meaning of loyalty within China's party elite and much more....

Beat Box
By MC Ledbetter

Updated for August 2016. Every month we recommend a few classic music CDs that rarely see the light of day. This month sees: Ebo Taylor, Clifton Chenier, Marc Ribot y Los Cubanos Postizos, Galactic, Antonio Serrano and Albert Sanz, Ali Khattab and The Cairo Jazz Band get main billing.

Greek Elections
By Eva Nanopoulos

A defeat of the radical left party Syriza in the upcoming Greek elections would not only mean a win for the conservative ‘New Democracy’ party. It would also testify to the growing prevalence of a ‘neo’ – and largely distorted – version of democracy explains Eva Nanopoulos, College Lecturer in Law at King’s College, University of Cambridge.

Is Turkey Holding Up a Resolution in Syria?
By Conn Hallinan

The pieces for a political deal to end the Syrian civil war are coming together — if Ankara will let them.

China, Questions of Loyalty
By Kerry Brown

What determines political survival among China's party elite? Where are the traps that ensnare men like Zhou Yongkang and Ling Jihua? The ambiguities of loyalty are a useful way to bring these questions into focus.

Great Gamble on the Mekong
By Nathaniel Eisen

A proposed dam on the Mekong River would provide energy for the region, but at a significant environmental cost. "Great Gamble on the Mekong", a new documentary from filmmaker and journalist Tom Fawthrop, insightfully details the probable dire consequences of this dam.

Tunisia: the Arab exception’s test
By Francis Ghilès

The election victory of Béji Caid Essebsi is a vital moment in the pioneer country of the Arab revolts. It also reveals the scale of Tunisia's economic challenges. "The new Tunisian leaders will also need western countries to put their money where their mouths are".

The Method in Israel’s Madness
By Deborah Maccoby

Israel has gone on the rampage in Gaza three times in six years. Norman Finkelstein's latest book is a devastating assault on the myths that make the massacres possible.

A 17th Century battle of wits. Libertines v Jesuits
By Edward Muir

Gabriel Naudé, the French free-thinker and Cardinal Mazarin’s librarian, famously claimed that seventeenth-century Italy was “full of libertines, atheists, and people who believe in nothing.

UN climate talks stumble on rich, poor divide
By Joydeep Gupta - Liu Hongqiao

Deep differences between developed and developing countries on how to divide the cost of tackling climate change are blocking agreement at the Lima summit.

 
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