Monthly Newsletter

Welcome to The Global Dispatches,

This month David Elstein, director of three episodes of the seminal "The World At War" series, finds "Dunkirk" to be a powerful film but one shorn of historical context. Here he fills in the vital gaps - and finds some curious anomalies; Andries du Toit, the Director of the Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies at the University of the Western Cape asks if we are standing on the brink of a new kind of nihilistic governmentality, where politics is turned into perpetual theatre, disconnected from any kind of coherent government programming; Juliano Fiori the Anglo-Brazilian writer,  Head of Studies (Humanitarian Affairs) at Save the Children finds that as Brazilian politics increasingly escape rational explanation, both the left and and the right get lost in the labyrinth of history; Hiromi Hara – Associate Professor of Economics, Japan Women’s University examines the gender wage gap in Japan that despite decreasing over the last 15 years, remains large. Both the ‘glass ceiling’ and the ‘sticky floor’ exist in the Japanese labour market... and much more...

 

The meaning of Dunkirk
By David Elstein

David Elstein, director of three episodes of the seminal "The World At War" series, finds Dunkirk to be a powerful film but one shorn of historical context. Here he fills in the vital gaps - and finds some curious anomalies.

Hyper-political anti-politics
By Andries du Toit

Are we standing on the brink of a new kind of nihilistic governmentality, where politics is turned into perpetual theatre, disconnected from any kind of coherent government programming?

Brazil in the labyrinth
By Juliano Fiori

As Brazilian politics increasingly escape rational explanation, both the left and and the right get lost in the labyrinth of history.

Dubai and Gwadar: economic war in the Gulf of Oman
By Tariq al-Shammari

The expansion of Gwadar port in Pakistan is a game-changing venture that would reformulate the economic agenda of the entire region.

Transition to clean technology
By D. Acemoglu, U. Akcigit, D. Hanley, W. Kerr

It wasn’t long ago – just last year, in fact – that a German car executive described Tesla Motors as “a joke that can't be taken seriously compared to the great car companies of Germany”

Historical roots of China’s industrial revolution
By Peter Lavelle

The coal-fired machines and visions of industrialised landscapes by Qing reformers were harbingers of things to come, writes Peter Lavelle

Japan’s ‘glass ceiling’ and ‘sticky floor’
By Hiromi Hara

Although the gender wage gap in Japan has been decreasing over the last 15 years, it remains large. Both the ‘glass ceiling’ and the ‘sticky floor’ exist in the Japanese labour market.

Natural Rights in the Age of Domination
By Carlos Cuellar Brown

How was it that we came to view planetary resources as ours to conquer and mine? Who gave us the right to exploit and consume everything that has been put before us?

 
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