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Opening wounds

By Ekrem Eddy Güzeldere in Features, August 28, 2014

Brazil was ruled by the military for 21 years from 1964 to 1985. In 1979 the generals gave themselves an amnesty for crimes committed during the dictatorship. However, since 2012, a truth commission has been collecting information, data and names. For the time being the torturers can only be punished morally, but the hope is to overturn the amnesty law in the future.

Israel’s Spinning Moral Compass

By Daniel Levy in Features, August 21, 2014

Apparent wall-to-wall consensus in favour of the Gaza offensive among the Israeli public masks a deep internal moral malaise and an erosion of democratic checks and balances explains Daniel Levy, Director of the Middle East and North Africa Program at the European Council on Foreign Relations

China tests its neighbours’ patience

By Isabel Hilton in Politics, August 19, 2014

China’s rapid growth is placing increasing demands on natural resources in the region but Beijing’s political rise is encouraging the dictatorship to flex its muscles.

Why the UK has no foreign policy

By Kirsty Hughes in Politics,

In the absence of any political lead either from their UK masters or their indirect US ones, the UK’s foreign office diplomats are left with little direction to exercise real clout, and no role, even on a realpolitik basis, to play in a changing and challenging world.

‘Caviar diplomacy’ hides human rights abuse in Azerbaijan

By Dominika Bychawska-Siniarska - Adam Bodnar in Politics, August 13, 2014

In Azerbaijan, prominent human rights defenders are being arrested; and NGOs raided. ‘Caviar diplomacy’ covers it all up.

How many minutes to midnight?

By Noam Chomsky in Features, August 7, 2014

Despite Hiroshima’s scars, history cruelly reveals one instance after another in which the US elected to maintain the power of nuclear weapons for statecraft, squandering opportunities to de-escalate in favor of building the case for the national security state.

Secret Prisons, Disappearances and Torture

By Rory O’Connell in Features,

In a ruling described by Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch as “landmark”, the European Court of Human Rights has passed excoriating judgment on the US “war on terror” following the attacks of 2001.

If only Turkey were Thrace …

By Ekrem Eddy Güzeldere in Politics,

On 10 August the first ever direct election of the president will take place in Turkey. Erdogan’s victory seems clear-cut, but In Thrace, Ihsanoğlu, the opposition candidate is expected to inflict a heavy defeat on the current Prime Minister. Thrace, however, is an exception and home to just over 2% of the population.

Gaza: a Ceasefire is not Enough

By Raji Sourani in Politics, August 5, 2014

Raji Sourani, the director of the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights, in his article with Electronic Intifada, explains that a ceasefire is not enough. Palestinians cannot just return to being prisoners in a cage that Israel rattles when it chooses with brutal destructive offensives.

The democratic drift

By Jean-Pierre Lehmann in Features, July 31, 2014

If the twentieth century was, in the language of the Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm, the “age of extremes”, then the twenty-first century may well be the age of democracy. And yet a profound sense of disconnect has emerged explains Jean-Pierre Lehmann, Emeritus Professor at IMD.