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France bids for climate leadership

By Ludovica Meacci in Environment, February 7, 2018

Macron’s call to ‘make our planet great again’ must start at home. France is continuing to invest aggressively in nuclear power at the cost of renewable energy, and recent commitments to limit the production of fossil fuels are less ambitious then they might appear.

What’s the impact of the East China Sea oil spill?

By Feng Jie in Environment, January 20, 2018

The Sanchi has sunk but it’s cargo could still damage the environment. The Sanchi was transporting 136,000 tonnes of condensate from Iran to South Korea when the collision happened.

About Shakespeare

By Geoffrey Heptonstall in Arts and Culture, January 16, 2018

Shakespeare discovered the secret of language. He had the advantage of living at a moment in history when a new language was coming into being. Modern English was emerging in common speech as a language of exceptional flexibility.

Creativity and freedom

By Michel Serafinelli, Guido Tabellini in Features, January 14, 2018

Innovation is often concentrated in certain geographic areas, or ‘creative clusters’. Data on famous births reveals the dynamics of creativity in European cities between the 11th and 19th centuries.

Yemen: 2017 in review

By Afrah Nasser in Politics,

2017 has been a year of utter despair in light of countless human rights atrocities committed on multi-fronts. Both key international allies to Saudi Arabia; the US and the UK have found Yemen’s war to be a lucrative business, profiting massively from the financial rewards of their arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

The Tunisian revolution seven years on

By Lakhdar Ghettas in Politics,

Seven years after the Tunisian revolution one can dissect four main conflict issues in Tunisia today.

A 17th Century battle of wits. Libertines v Jesuits

By Edward Muir in Arts and Culture, January 10, 2018

Gabriel Naudé, the French free-thinker and Cardinal Mazarin’s librarian, famously claimed that seventeenth-century Italy was “full of libertines, atheists, and people who believe in nothing.

Reminiscences of a Trainee Tea Buyer

By Colin Conor in Features, January 2, 2018

A look back at a bygone era, when the drinking of tea involved ceremony and respect for the plant. Colin Conor recalls his life as a trainee tea buyer in London and offers an almost foolproof method for brewing the perfect cup of tea.

Catalonia’s December 21 elections

By Patrice de Beer in Politics, December 18, 2017

It is time for the Spanish establishment to realise that their country, like any other democracy, can’t be maintained harmoniously only by threatening the use of force and prison sentences.

Big media and big money in 2017

By Des Freedman in Features,

From Disney/Murdoch to Net Neutrality. This week’s events have shown that the new digital media landscape is every bit as monopolistic as the old one. And what’s Murdoch up to now?